Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me Movie Poster
  • Released
  • June 11, 1999
  • PG-13, 1 hr 35 min
  • Comedy
  • 36 Fan Ratings

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Common Sense Says
Common Sense Media

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me is a 1999 sequel that's very, very, very raunchy, with incessant and prolonged sexual humor. Because it's a comedy, the rating system gives it a PG-13, but the material would clearly get an R if it appeared in a drama. Do not kid yourself that some of these jokes are "over their heads." Those kids who do not see it -- or who do see it and miss some of the jokes -- will hear detailed explanations from those who do of references like Powers asking one woman "Which is it, spits or swallows?" and pretty much every woman "Do I make you horny?" In addition, the movie features character names Felicity Shagwell, Fat Bastard, and Ivana Humpalot, a rocket shaped like a penis (described by a series of characters with every imaginable euphemism), references to a one-night stand "getting weird," an extended sequence in which it appears that a number of objects are removed from Powers' rectum, and Powers' inability to perform in bed due to his missing "mojo." There is also a good deal of potty humor, including Powers mistaking a stool sample for coffee. There is also a joke referencing a lesbian character who met her girlfriend on the "LPGA tour." Profanity includes "s--t," "bitch," and "nuts."

  • Positive messages
  • Positive role models
  • Violence
  • Sexual
  • Language
  • Consumerism
  • Drinking & drugs
Common Sense is the nation's leading nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in the 21st Century.