A 'Django' Primer

Django Unchained

Here are a few reasons we want to see Django Unchained ASAP. Christoph Waltz. Jamie Foxx. Lots of guns. And Tarantino. Wait, there are a few more things. Leo DiCaprio. Against Christoph Waltz and Jamie Foxx. With lots of guns. And Tarantino.
 
  • Django Unchained Django Unchained
    Here are a few reasons we want to see Django Unchained ASAP. Christoph Waltz. Jamie Foxx. Lots of guns. And Tarantino. Wait, there are a few more things. Leo DiCaprio. Against Christoph Waltz and Jamie Foxx. With lots of guns. And Tarantino.
  • Reservoir Dogs Reservoir Dogs
    Thankfully, in honor of Tarantino's 20 years in the business, the clever powers that be are providing moviegoers with a chance to see his seminal films Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction in theaters one more time. On Dec. 4, you'll get to see Tim Roth, Harvey Keitel, Steve Buscemi, et. al. stroll down the alley in slo-mo looking cooler than cool in black shades and suits before heading off to their heist job. Then all hell breaks loose.
  • True Romance True Romance
    Sandwiched in between the '92 release of Reservoir Dogs and the '94 release of Pulp Fiction was '93's Tarantino-penned, Tony Scott-directed True Romance. Sort of the best cross between Top Gun and some of Tarantino's greatest early dialogue, the tale of lovers on the lam Clarence and Alabama Worley (Christian Slater, Patricia Arquette) is a smorgasbord of ecstatic, violent entertainment. It also includes one of the all-time actor showdowns between Christopher Walken's Italian gangster and Dennis Hopper's gritty security guard/ex-cop.
  • Natural Born Killers Natural Born Killers
    While True Romance upped the ante of commercial filmmaking crossed with mile-a-minute pop culture dialogue and topped with extra heapings of wit and smart sass (like listening to Tarantino himself), one interesting experiment of Tarantino-ism was the Oliver Stone-directed Natural Born Killers. The writer and director fell out during the making of the project, but what was left behind is worth a look. It's possibly the darkest vision of Tarantino's filmmaking mindset, and that's no doubt due to Stone's frenetic filmmaking, which finds Rodney Dangerfield cast as a sexually abusive parent (seen in flashbacks plus a sitcom laugh track) and literal cartoon moments of extreme violence.
  • Pulp Fiction Pulp Fiction
    On Dec. 6, Tarantino's breakthrough masterpiece will once again play on big screens everywhere. After the 1-2 punch of Reservoir Dogs and True Romance, and just a couple months after the release of Natural Born Killers, Tarantino changed the movie vocabulary of the '90s with this ridiculously entertaining and groundbreaking mishmash of genre filmmaking about hit men, a down-but-not-out boxer, a kingpin's girlfriend, a gold watch and lots of talk about things like a "royale with cheese" and "foot massages."
  • Grindhouse Grindhouse
    Here's a novel idea. Throw together two semi-full-length movies from Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez that pay homage to their love of '70s grindhouse B-horror flicks. Then call it a double feature, complete with faux trailers for fake horror films like Machete and Werewolf Women of the SS (actually, they later made Machete into a real film). The great thing here is that it actually worked. Tarantino's piece, called Death Proof and starring Kurt Russell as a homicidal driver named Stunt Man Mike, is especially awesome.
  • Inglourious Basterds Inglourious Basterds
    Tarantino deftly moved into classic Dirty Dozen / Great Escape territory with this epic war movie that takes place in an alternate universe where World War II doesn't exactly end the way it did in this one. No matter. With a master like Tarantino at the helm, this multi-layered narrative has plenty of trademark irrepressible Tarantino dialogue scenes alongside some nifty action set pieces. Plus, it has Brad Pitt as a tough-as-nails Special Service Force Lieutenant named Aldo Raine. And a new talent named Christoph Waltz in a scene-stealing, Academy Award-winning turn as the nefarious Colonel Hans Landa.
 
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