Jesus Christ Superstar Movie Poster
  • Released
  • August 15, 1973
  • G, 1 hr 47 min
  • Music/Performing Arts
  • 33 Fan Ratings

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Common Sense Says
Common Sense Media

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Jesus Christ Superstar, a filmed version of Andrew Lloyd Webber's hugely successful staged rock opera, is a fantastical departure from its biblical source. Using a "play-within-a-play" format, the last week of Jesus' life is acted out by a ragtag group of 1970s bohemians (or "flower children) in a desolate desert setting. There is no dialogue. Rock music provides plot and mood and accompanies all the action. Director Norman Jewison blends modernity with antiquity throughout. Costumes change from 1973 to 29 A.D. and back again. Twentieth-century weaponry, dancing, and, of course, rock music, become the means of retelling this age-old story. Despite the G rating the film earned in 1973, there is considerable violence, including Jesus receiving 39 lashes (with lots of blood); Judas Iscariot taking his own life; and a lengthy, intense sequence depicting Jesus' crucifixion. This is an experimental work, controversial when it was first released. Audiences expecting a traditional Christian recounting will be surprised, at the very least. Given the graphic nature of the violence, as well as the unconventional treatment of Jesus' last days, the movie is best for older or very mature kids.

  • Positive messages
  • Positive role models
  • Violence
  • Sexual
  • Language
  • Consumerism
  • Drinking & drugs
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