90

The Hollywood Reporter

By David Rooney
The film is that rare modern horror movie that doesn’t simply fabricate its scares with the standard bag of postproduction tricks. Instead it builds them via a bracing command of traditional suspense tools... This is polished film craft.
Full Review
86

Film.com

By William Goss
Among the stronger American horror films of the year.
Full Review
85

NPR

By Ian Buckwalter
Mickle and co-writer Nick Damici gutted Grau's story to the bone. And they not only built something entirely new on that skeleton — they managed to equal and in many ways surpass the dark, bloody beauty of their source material.
Full Review
83

indieWIRE

By Eric Kohn
Make no mistake: Mickle wants to make you jump and scream, but death only arrives in this movie once its world comes to life, which makes each sudden turn all the more intense.
Full Review
83

The Playlist

By Jessica Kiang
We Are What We Are is just a great yarn, well-acted, elegantly shot and put together cleverly so that even its more visceral delights feel well-earned.
Full Review
80

Salon.com

By Andrew O'Hehir
There’s a hint of Terrence Malick (or David Lowery, of “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints”) in the often-gorgeous photography of Ryan Samul, and a hint of Shakespearean grandeur in Sage’s portrayal of a dignified and honorable American father infused with an ideology of madness. I’m pretty sure I’ve never seen an exploitation film played so effectively as human tragedy.
Full Review
75

New York Post

By Sara Stewart
A first-rate example of good storytelling and well-timed — while not excessive — gore. Its disgusting, hilarious conclusion left me eager to see what’ll be next from director Jim Mickle.
Full Review
75

Chicago Sun-Times

By Bill Stamets
A family implodes with a biting commentary on patriarchy.
Full Review
70

Village Voice

By Pete Vonder Haar
It isn't until the ending, which turns the squirm amplifier up to 11 and exceeded even my horrific expectations, that we finally see the story's potential realized.
Full Review
70

Variety

By Guy Lodge
That We Are What We Are steers just shy of silliness even at its most outrageous is in large part thanks to a committed cast of non-disposable character actors.
Full Review
70 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.