• Released
  • December 7, 2012
  • (Limited)
  • PG-13 , 1 hr 36 min
  • Documentary
  • 3 Fan Ratings
67

Portland Oregonian

By Marc Mohan
The line between fearlessness and idiocy can be a thin one, especially in this sport, and the doc never gets too far under Way's skin. But when he soars -- on a skateboard! -- above the massive structure that kept invading armies at bay for centuries, it's pretty darn cool.
Full Review
60

New York Daily News

By Joe Neumaier
Colorful folks and cool stunts abound, but casual viewers may still utter a big "Why?"
Full Review
50

San Francisco Chronicle

It's enjoyable enough, but how much you like it will depend on how much you like skateboarding and extreme sports.
Full Review
50

Washington Post

By Michael O'Sullivan
There's more waiting than lightning in Waiting for Lightning, a nonetheless watchable-enough documentary about the preparations leading up to professional skateboarder Danny Way's historic 2005 attempt to sail over the Great Wall of China on a skateboard.
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50

Village Voice

Unfortunately, as the extensive footage of kick flips, fakies, and grinders goes from thrilling to routine, we're left waiting - and wanting - for Rosenberg to offer something more substantial than another "big air."
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50

Los Angeles Times

Unfortunately, the athlete himself simply isn't much of a presence in this documentary, even as the film aims to celebrate him.
Full Review
40

The Hollywood Reporter

By Frank Scheck
Eventually, though, Waiting For Lightning suffers greatly from the absence of Way himself.
Full Review
40

Time Out New York

By Nick Schager
Director Jacob Rosenberg's approach is heavy with archival footage and interviews, yet oddly features almost nothing from Way himself; his puzzling absence for most of the film turns the project into less of a biography than a one-note hagiography.
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38

Slant Magazine

By Andrew Schenker
With Danny Way almost never weighing in directly, the film's attempts to portray his story as an inspirational tale of triumph over adversity scarcely registers.
Full Review
38

New York Post

By V.A. Musetto
Director Jacob Rosenberg makes heavy use of family photos and talking heads, but the person we want most to hear from, Way himself, is largely missing. Go figure.
Full Review
45 out of 100
Mixed or average reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.