88

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
In this haunting portrait of America as no country for old men or young, Hillcoat -- through the artistry of Mortensen and Smit-McPhee -- carries the fire of our shared humanity and lets it burn bright and true.
Full Review
88

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
The Road evokes the images and the characters of Cormac McCarthy's novel. It is powerful, but for me lacks the same core of emotional feeling.
Full Review
88

USA Today

By Claudia Puig
While the film is not as resonant as the novel, it is an honorable adaptation, capturing the essence of the bond between father and son.
Full Review
80

New York Daily News

By Joe Neumaier
Intense and, yes, depressing - and earns every minute that it rattles inside your head.
Full Review
80

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
Between the two performances there's not a false note. Between the father and son there's an unbreakable bond. Though civilization has ended, love and parental duty shape the course of this fable, which is otherwise as heartwarming as a Beckett play shorn of humor.
Full Review
75

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
The Road isn't a masterpiece...But I cannot think of another film this year that has stayed with me, its images of dread and fear - and yes, perhaps hope - kicking around like such a terrible dream.
Full Review
75

San Francisco Chronicle

The latest in a year filled with Armageddon movies such as "Terminator Salvation" and "2012," and it won't be the last, but it's the most chilling so far.
Full Review
70

The Hollywood Reporter

Director John Hillcoat has performed an admirable job of bringing Cormac McCarthy's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to the screen as an intact and haunting tale, even at the cost of sacrificing color, big scenes and standard Hollywood imagery of post-apocalyptic America.
Full Review
67

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
There's enough foreboding in America right now to make sitting through a movie such as The Road seem like one more heavy burden that, frankly, no one needs.
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63

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
Everything about the film is a welcome rebuke to the happy-face apocalypse of “2012,’’ a movie that turns mass extinction into the Greatest Show on Earth. In The Road, what has been lost is recognized as infinitely precious; what’s left is bitter and our due.
Full Review
64 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.