90

Film Threat

By Pete Vonder Haar
Smartly edited, utterly engrossing, and as intelligent an examination of American race relations as I've seen.
Full Review
90

The New York Times

By Manohla Dargis
Eschewing voice-over or any obvious trace of an on-screen or off-screen presence, she (Brown) lets her images, a little text and other people do the talking for her. Her quiet has its own force.
Full Review
90

Los Angeles Times

An invaluable portrait of us-and-them America, a smart, generous, poignant, quietly disturbing movie about secrecy and hospitality, and how easy it is for a tradition of separateness to flourish when the stakes are as deceptively frivolous as an eye-popping yearly party.
Full Review
88

TV Guide

By Maitland McDonagh
Margaret Brown's documentary is actually an examination of the racial divide in a city that claims there is none.
Full Review
80

New York Magazine (Vulture)

By David Edelstein
Brown explores a potentially enraging subject--rigidly upheld racial segregation in the country's oldest Mardi Gras celebration, in Mobile, Alabama--but her touch is so unforced and her gaze so open that no one is bruised.
Full Review
78

Austin Chronicle

"They have their Mardi Gras; we have ours," the explanation goes on both sides, but everyone seems to realize it's just a rationalization aimed at covering over Mobile's docile perpetuation of segregation.
Full Review
70

Salon.com

By Andrew O'Hehir
Moving and surprising documentary.
Full Review
70

Washington Post

Gracefully explores Mobile's Mardi Gras celebrations and profiles the young people playing at royalty at these ceremonies' hearts.
Full Review
70

Village Voice

Quietly shocking, The Order of Myths is a deft, engrossing cross-section of Mobile life, heavy on local color and insight.
Full Review
70

The Hollywood Reporter

By James Greenberg
Exotic and thoughtful.
Full Review
79 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.