Critics Say

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By lakeclifftexas
Written October 29, 2014
An innovative take on a rarely performed Baroque opera, with an outstanding cast. The updated production worked very well. Handel would have been pleased.
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Giulio Cesare - unexpectedly comic, counter-tenor a shock, overall wonderful

By mchyun
Written April 28, 2013
This was my first experience seeing this opera. I was delighted to find it had a comic aspect. I was shocked to learn that Cesare had a high voice (falsetto,counter-tenor) and not a deep commanding baritone. The plot went from flirtatious, to dangerous, to romantic, to bloody and back again to a crowning glory at the end. The production was terrifically inventive and dazzling. I'd love to see it again. The performers were all superb.
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Bravo!

By K imperiale
Written May 11, 2013
Superb, if you have a chance to catch a Met Opera production on the big screen take it!
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Giulio Cesare

By phoebecampbell
Written April 29, 2013
I hated this production so much I left after the first act. What a waste of talent and beautiful voices: Natalie Dessay, David Daniels, Christophe Dumaux, Giudo Locosolo. It was worse than Rigoletto in Las Vegas. It was insulting to the performers and to the audience: dumbing down a beautiful work of art!
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My reaction to Giulio Cesare

By Rigoletto51
Written May 07, 2013
I have not enjoyed some of the Met's new productions, especially La Traviata and Rigoletto. I am inclined to agree with the critic who, in commenting on the Met's new Ring, said that "pound for pound, ton for ton, this is the most witless and wasteful production in operatic history. However, back to the current topic. I thought that the production was witty and well conceived. Natalie Dessay was in good voice, and her dancing and acting were delightful. It seems chic to have elements of different periods mixing it up on the operatic stage, and in this production, I don't think it was objectionable. My problem, and this is my problem with many baroque operas, is that they tend to be imbalanced in favor of the high voices. Counter tenors certainly serve a purpose in presenting baroque opera, since castrati are extinct, but, personally, I am just not crazy about the timbre of this particular kind of voice.
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