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Aida

By dinnigordo
Written September 03, 2014
The Met opera is always great and this was no exception. The new star, Lyudmyla Monastyrska clearly has a big career ahead of her--wonderful singing with perfect control of the soft passages. The HD broadcasts are fabulous for the closeups you get and for the backstage interviews. But the theaters must solve their technical problems with this kind of transmission. There was a big shadow over the bottom of the screen (11th Street and 3rd Avenue) for the first few minutes, and then after it was corrected there were occasional roars from what I imagine was the heating/air conditioning system--very distracting. The same kind of roar was also present in the Rgal theater (Union Square) where I went three weeks ago to see 'The Clemenza di Tito." I hope Fandango will use its influence to improve this deficiency.
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Aida

By seniorreviewer
Written September 02, 2014
This is a must go if you are an opera fan. This was our first experience with The Metropolitan Opera Live-HD. One would expect the sets and music to be great, but what makes the theater experience in some ways better than seeing it at the Met is the chance to hear interviews with the lead singers, the maestro, and key production staff. The closeup shots of the stars provide an intimacy not possible even you were in the front row of the Met. The intermissions are long, but it's fascinating to observe backstage as the crews move massive sets in place between acts. And what better opera to see for our initiation than AIDA! Liudmyla Monastyrska in the title role was simply magnificent in her Met debut. She has a great future ahead of her.
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Aida

By movieoperalover
Written December 16, 2012
Wonderful voices and music! Again volume a too high, so vioces distorted. At 3rd Avenue nd 11th Street, they MUST remember to turn off overhead lights before the Opera begins, and after the intermissions! Katheine Manisco.
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Verdi's Aida portrays the corruption of absolute powerlessness

By starlove
Written September 16, 2014
The MET's superb portrayal of a powerful figure, Princess Amneris, daughter of the King of Egypt, is a vivid illustration of Lord Acton's dictum, "Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely." Yet what is demonstrated by the opera, just as effectively, is the dialectical opposite of Acton's observation. The late H. Richard Niebuhr, Yale Professor of Theology and Ethics, offered this rejoinder, "Powerlessness also corrupts, and absolute powerlessness corrupts absolutely." Aida's father Amonasro, King of Ethiopia, sensing his powerlessness in confrontation with Egypt's power, pleads with his daughter to find out from Radames the route the Egyptian army will take as it invades Ethiopia. Finally Aida acquiesces, out of a sense of loyalty to her country, even though she knows that will betray Radames, whom she loves so deeply. Amonasro's absolute powerlessness had corrupted him absolutely. The tragedy is set in motion, with heightened anxiety.
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Great movie

By bridget97
Written December 16, 2012
Wonderful except you could hear loud booming and base sounds from the theatre next to where Aida was being shown. Very distracting during the prelude. Denver , 500 16th St . AMC.
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