60

Time Out New York

By Joshua Rothkopf
Too many digital effects ruin the spell of a tactile world of evil objects scheming your demise. But even a mediocre FD is better than more Jigsaw.
Full Review
58

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
It's no exaggeration to say that the actors have less personality than the pipes, nail guns, grinding gears, decaying beams, and slowly spreading oil spills that are fused, with a kind of empty-dread technical precision, into Rube Goldberg torture devices.
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50

L.A. Weekly

By Scott Foundas
Ellis and screenwriter Eric Bress even go all meta on us with an "Inglourious Basterds"–esque finale set inside a 3D cinema, though their set pieces never quite muster the giddy brio of "Final Destination 1" and "3" auteur James Wong at his best.
Full Review
50

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
If you like your gore hardcore, you'll want to head straight for "Halloween II." But if you're happy to ease around a slightly smaller track, look no further.
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50

Los Angeles Times

Though this latest entry has an OK sense of humor, moves swiftly enough and sports an effective opening sequence of racetrack destruction that puts its Fusion 3-D technology to good use, it mostly comes off as a particularly flimsy excuse to string together a bunch of gory killings.
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40

Empire

The novelty factor stops and starts at the 3-D specs: this is a horror movie on tracks, not going anyplace new. Still, there’s some inventive grue-splashing as always.
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30

The Hollywood Reporter

By Kirk Honeycutt
The new gimmick here is that all the flying body parts and absurd impalements come in 3D. And that's about as inspired as anything gets in this edition. Story and character get chucked to the sidelines as the arena has room for only death scenes.
Full Review
25

New Orleans Times-Picayune

By Mike Scott
The characters aren't fully formed enough to care about, the humor is baseball-bat dull, and the story - such as it is - is never treated as anything more than a half-hearted means to get the audiences from one spectacular snuffing to the next.
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12

Boston Globe

By Wesley Morris
The writers don’t write, the director doesn’t really direct, and the actors don’t exactly act. They wait for the movie’s contraptions to impale them.
Full Review
11

Austin Chronicle

By Marc Savlov
As mesmerizing as watching bread toast. Death, be not proud, indeed.
Full Review
30 out of 100
Generally unfavorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.