100

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
Rachel Weisz - in what has to be the performance of her career, and there have been lots of good ones - plays an intelligent woman in the grip of a lust that's too big to handle or suppress. She can either ride the tiger or be devoured.
Full Review
100

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
In this typically exquisite, nuanced, memory-infused work from master British filmmaker Terence Davies, we believe every minute of the torment of Hester (Rachel Weisz).
Full Review
88

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
The beautiful misery of The Deep Blue Sea - Terence Davies' crushing adaptation of Terence Rattigan's 1952 play - is almost too much.
Full Review
88

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
The film most of all is about Hester, who stares out the window and smokes.
Full Review
80

NPR

By Jeannette Catsoulis
Propriety and recklessness make for uneasy bedfellows in The Deep Blue Sea, a shimmering exploration of romantic obsession and the tension between fitting in and flying free.
Full Review
75

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
The film is a striking cinematic tone poem.
Full Review
75

Boston Globe

By Wesley Morris
Rachel Weisz has become an exquisite camera artist. In a single shot, she can open up a whole movie. The Deep Blue Sea has a scene like that.
Full Review
75

Movieline

By Stephanie Zacharek
There's such a thing as having too much reverence for your material, and although Davies is an extraordinarily gifted and principled director, The Deep Blue Sea may suffer for that reverence.
Full Review
70

The Hollywood Reporter

By Todd McCarthy
As intensely personal and deeply felt as it is, however, Davies' attempt to breathe new life into Rattigan's 1952 play is a rather bloodless, suffocating thing, lent tragic passion more by its use of Samuel Barber's Violin Concerto than by anything achieved by his star Rachel Weisz and her leading man.
Full Review
60

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
Weisz's meticulously crafted turn is certainly touching, but it lacks the immediacy of, say, Celia Johnson's in 1945's "Brief Encounter."
Full Review
82 out of 100
Universal acclaim
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.