88

New York Observer

By Rex Reed
Every complex member of the writer’s legacy has an agenda, with varying gains and losses, and the power of the film rests in the way it captures so many tangled lives as they cross and intersect at curious angles. The camera is literal, so the film sometimes fails to escape its roots of literary inspiration. This did not bother me. How many times do you get the chance to curl up with a good movie?
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75

Philadelphia Inquirer

A movie that feels as if it should have been a masterpiece. As it is, it's flawed, uneven work but deserves careful viewing.
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70

The Hollywood Reporter

Its appeal naturally will be to book-reading audiences who appreciate films with well-written dialogue, a tony cast, lush visuals and the triumph of civilized values.
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63

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
What was intended as a tart elegy for a vanished way of life becomes a valedictory to a certain kind of filmmaking: beautifully appointed, intelligently played, and civilized into inertia.
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63

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

By Joe Williams
With its seductive images and smart dialogue, The City of Your Final Destination has the setting and circumstances for a ripe family drama or a literary love story, yet it never awakens from its siesta.
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58

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
Lovely to look at -- and languid to the point of stultifying torpor, as interesting characters make speeches to one another about life, love, and literature.
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55

NPR

By Ella Taylor
The City of Your Final Destination does eventually prove intelligent enough about how we all become prisoners of dependency and obsession. Yet for a movie that argues for free agency and following your bliss rather than your career, it's awfully torpid.
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50

San Francisco Chronicle

From the start, we can see where this is headed: a big fat power struggle, with Omar at the eye of the storm. But the storm is more of a drizzle than an apocalyptic downpour, just one snippy conversation after another in languorous settings.
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50

New York Post

By Lou Lumenick
This long and overly genteel adaptation of Peter Cameron's 2002 novel never quite comes to a boil.
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40

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
Ivory appears most concerned about creating a mood, and in this regard he's successful. But Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's surprisingly bland screenplay, based on Peter Cameron's novel, feels half-finished
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52 out of 100
Mixed or average reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.