75

Miami Herald

By Connie Ogle
Screenwriter/director Tornatore is best known for his nostalgic "Cinema Paradiso," which won the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar in 1990. But The Best Offer is completely different in style and tone; it’s dark instead of light, a psychological thriller of sorts, only with Virgil’s heart and orderly life in peril instead of his life.
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70

The Dissolve

By Andrew Lapin
Between its erotic underpinnings and increasingly preposterous third-act reveals, the film could easily pass for middle-grade Hitchcock. Since its premise is that forgeries can still have value, that’s a high compliment.
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70

New York Magazine (Vulture)

By Bilge Ebiri
Part of the pleasure in watching The Best Offer is the elegant, unassumingly suspenseful way it unfolds. You never quite know where it’s all headed, in part because it never quite tells you what kind of movie it is. I called it a “romantic thriller,” but there’s a lot more movie here than that.
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70

Los Angeles Times

By Gary Goldstein
The film has several smart twists and surprises up its well-tailored sleeve.
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63

New York Post

By Kyle Smith
An intriguingly Hitchcockian premise gradually takes on a preposterous air in the art-world noir The Best Offer.
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63

Chicago Sun-Times

By Bill Stamets
Tornatore’s ideas about art, trust and intimacy are curious, even if they do not quite click.
Full Review
60

Village Voice

By Aaron Hillis
Vertigo this ain’t, but there’s some quasi-Gothic charm in the baroque premise and eccentric marginal details, including a mathematically gifted dwarf.
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60

The Hollywood Reporter

By Deborah Young
Though it begs for a little lightening up, a moment of irony, a wink at the audience, this dead-serious fairy tale about a mysterious young woman (and a phantom automaton straight out of Hugo) is worth watching for Geoffrey Rush’s sensitive, never pandering performance.
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40

The New York Times

By Nicolas Rapold
Mr. Rush can’t fly far on Mr. Tornatore’s dialogue and workmanlike plotting, and Sylvia Hoeks, as Claire, doesn’t bring a corresponding energy.
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40

Variety

By Jay Weissberg
Aiming for a Hitchcockian take on an eccentric auctioneer (well-handled by Geoffrey Rush) who becomes enamored of an heiress with severe agoraphobia, the pic ends up more in Dan Brown territory, with over-obvious setups and phony insight into the art establishment.
Full Review
49 out of 100
Mixed or average reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.