90

Variety

By Justin Chang
Director Alex Gibney delivers not just a detailed, full-access account of his subject, in all his defiance, hubris and tentative self-reckoning, but also a layered inquiry into the culture of competitiveness, celebrity, moral relativism and hypocrisy that helped enable and sustain his deception.
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90

Village Voice

By Chuck Wilson
To use a phrase from the film, The Armstrong Lie is a "myth-buster." It's wholly necessary, brilliantly executed, and a complete bummer.
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88

Chicago Sun-Times

By Bruce Ingram
You’d have to start looking into ancient Greek tragedy to top it as a showcase for pure, unadulterated hubris. That’s one of the things that makes The Armstrong Lie, which has more on its mind than the mere debunking of a tarnished hero, so worthwhile.
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88

USA Today

By Claudia Puig
He lies with such conviction it's terrifying. And his galling hubris is all there for audiences to watch, absorb and puzzle over in the fascinating The Armstrong Lie.
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83

Entertainment Weekly

By Chris Nashawaty
It's a fascinating film that points the finger at a charismatic master of deception — as well as our willingness to buy his deceit.
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80

The Guardian

Succeeds as a probing look into the mechanics of an epic lie, and because of the emotion at its heart.
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75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Peter Hartlaub
Armstrong acted like a demon, but it becomes clear there were very, very few angels associated with the sport in the 1990s and early 2000s.
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75

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
An idol had fallen, and Gibney and the superb director of photography Maryse Alberti were there to capture the descent, including a confessional interview in which Armstrong blames the corruption of the game far more than himself. The movie rambles at two-plus hours, but the provocation never stops.
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75

Miami Herald

By Rene Rodriguez
Gibney even convinced Armstrong to sit down for one final interview in May. In it, he comes off as somewhat contrite but also victimized, as if he were being single out for something everyone does.
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75

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
The Armstrong Lie is one for the time capsule, because it preserves for future generations a very particular modern response to scandal: confession without remorse.
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67 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.