100

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Wilmington
A grand ride. Sleek, beautiful and packed with emotion, not too flashy but full of heart, this is a movie worthy of its unlikely yet glorious subject: Depression-era America's best-loved racehorse and the two races that made him a legend.
Full Review
88

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
Unabashedly hokey, but would you want it any other way? In an era of cynical junk (did anyone say “Bad Boys II”?), Ross restores the good name of crowd-pleasing.
Full Review
80

The Hollywood Reporter

By Kirk Honeycutt
Actors dominate with finely nuanced performances where every scene feels dramatically right.
Full Review
75

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Carrie Rickey
The three (human) leads are perfection. Bridges' Howard is as breezily garrulous and glad-handing as Cooper's Smith is laconic and withdrawn. Maguire's Pollard has haunted eyes and orangey hair that makes him look like a human jack-o'-lantern, and establishes his own unique rhythm and less-is-more style.
Full Review
75

New York Daily News

By Jami Bernard
This rousing story of the comeback colt comes close to a modern-day Frank Capra film without the pandering or mawkishness. Yes, it's a bit hokey, but if you fight the movie's gait you'll miss the excitement of the race.
Full Review
75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
Ross surrendered himself to the tale, lavishing time on the characters, getting the period details right and making the races look authentic. The result is a faithful, loving piece of work, and the love shows.
Full Review
75

USA Today

By Mike Clark
Fortunately, a movie that needs some levity gets a comic boost from William H. Macy as a fictional racing handicapper from the golden days of radio. As if training a horse, Macy cues us to laugh every time he's on screen.
Full Review
75

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
In the end, Seabiscuit gets right the things that matter.
Full Review
70

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
For all its pictorial splendor and carefully calculated drama, this film misses greatness by a country mile.
Full Review
67

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
Trembles with respect for Hillenbrand's book. It's hobbled by good intentions, grand plans for telling many stories at once, and a fear of the very audience whose intelligence and sophistication it claims to court.
Full Review
72 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.