70

The Hollywood Reporter

By Deborah Young
It would be hard to find two more contrasting actresses than Otto and Pires, but Barreto plays off their differences in culture and personality.
Full Review
60

Time Out London

By Trevor Johnston
The film never works out how to generate genuine dramatic fire from its material. There are convincing performances and decorative retro detail to admire, but the heart needs to beat just that bit faster – and it doesn’t manage that.
Full Review
60

Variety

By Guy Lodge
Attention is retained by the commendably unhistrionic leads, who convincingly etch the pair’s enduring devotion even when passions run dry.
Full Review
50

San Francisco Chronicle

By Walter Addiego
Despite its worthy subject, this feature by veteran Brazilian director Bruno Barreto has a bluntness that's at odds with Bishop's personality and work.
Full Review
40

The New York Times

By Nicolas Rapold
Ms. Otto conveys a double-edged intelligence as the film’s pinched notion of “Elizabeth Bishop in Brazil,” while Ms. Pires strides about, every snap judgment and grand gesture a measure of her appeal. Both are hemmed in by direction and a screenplay that are relentlessly on point (as well as an off-the-shelf score).
Full Review
40

Los Angeles Times

By Robert Abele
Everything ultimately gives way to the stately, simplistic, inevitable pace of by-the-numbers biopics, from some woefully tinny, hit-and-run screenwriting to the usual difficulties surrounding the dramatization of an author's craft.
Full Review
38

Slant Magazine

By Diego Costa
Bruno Barreto's insistence that this pass for a product that Hollywood might have spawned smoothens a journey built on sharp edges.
Full Review
30

Village Voice

By Calum Marsh
Poetry refracts life; this film can only reflect it, and tritely at that.
Full Review
44 out of 100
Mixed or average reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.