88

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

By Joe Williams
Notwithstanding the characters’ spiritual camaraderie, Salles’ emphasizes the hard physical labor and loneliness in Sal’s story, including the jittery rigors of the writing process. When he reaches a crossroads choice between down-and-out Dean and his own rising career, Sal senses that except for the words on a typewritten scroll, his life on the road is gone, real gone.
Full Review
75

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
A straightforward and rather sane version of the events described in the book and, against all odds, a surprisingly effective movie.
Full Review
75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
The result is a movie that, like the book, is episodic and has dips in energy but has more than its share of glory and illumination.
Full Review
75

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
On the Road is an honorable homage to the bennies-and-booze-and-bebop-driven hegiras undertaken by the fiercely dedicated anti-establishment duo. But in Salles, screenwriter Jose Rivera and company's effort to get the details right, they only get so far. And it's not quite far enough.
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75

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Phillips
Call it a successful failure. Some movies worth seeing are like that.
Full Review
70

The Hollywood Reporter

By Todd McCarthy
Stewart, selected for Marylou five years ago on the basis of her striking debut in "Into the Wild," is perfect in the role, takes off her clothes more than once and nearly always seems to be breaking a sweat, which kicks the sexiness quotient up high.
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67

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
What Salles doesn't conjure is the rapture of Kerouac's bohemian romanticism. Without it, On the Road is a remote experience, all reason and no rhyme.
Full Review
60

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
Salles has made an admirable effort, which - while no roman candle - can be appreciated for its honest ambitions.
Full Review
50

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
A dash of Tarantino might have juiced up Walter Salles' wrongheadedly well-mannered take on Jack Kerouac's 1957 Beat Generation landmark. Kerouac's semi-autobiographical novel comes to the screen looking good but feeling shallow.
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40

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
The narrative lacks a strong heartbeat; you keep wondering why the spectacle isn't as affecting as it is picturesque.
Full Review
56 out of 100
Mixed or average reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.