• Released
  • January 19, 1940
  • Comedy
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Synopsis

Nothing But Pleasure was hardly any pleasure at all. The third of Buster Keaton's ten two-reel comedies for Columbia went absolutely nowhere fast despite a good set-up. Keaton and wife (Dorothy Appleby) combine a car-buying spree in Detroit with what they assume will be a pleasant drive home. Naturally, the trip turns into a nightmare. Veteran Keaton collaborator Clyde Bruckman borrowed pieces of business from his distant past, including W.C. Fields' The Man in the Flying Trapeze and Keaton's own Spite Marriage (1929). From the latter Bruckman lifted a famous gag where Buster carries a drunken woman to bed. Hysterically funny back in 1929, perhaps, less so ten years and a long struggle with alcoholism later. Former B-Western star Addison Randall (aka Jack Randall) and future MGM lead Robert Sterling appeared in bit parts. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

Provided by Rovi