100

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Wilmington
Nobody Knows, by the often excellent Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda, is one of those special movies that can give us a new way of seeing.
Full Review
100

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
It's a quietly powerful work, pulsing with gentle humor and a gripping sense of imminent calamity and dread.
Full Review
100

San Francisco Chronicle

By Carla Meyer
The film, winsome and tragic at once and finely attuned to the rhythms of childhood, always seems quite close to real life.
Full Review
100

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
Yagira's performance is so extraordinary, it won him the best actor prize at the 2004 Cannes film festival.
Full Review
90

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
Apart from a singer named You who plays Keiko, the members of the cast are non-professionals. You may find that hard to believe when you see this astonishing film, as I hope you will.
Full Review
88

New York Post

By V.A. Musetto
Kore-eda presents the deeply moving story in a documentary style that is both gentle and compelling.
Full Review
88

The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

By Stephen Cole
Nothing short of mesmerizing.
Full Review
88

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
There are moments in Yagira's performance that will break your heart.
Full Review
88

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
Spare and elegant and harrowing, it's an ode to childhood trust being stretched until it snaps.
Full Review
75

New York Daily News

By Jami Bernard
Excellent, troubling social commentary based on a true story.
Full Review
88 out of 100
Universal acclaim
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.