75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Peter Hartlaub
Helm gets huge bonus points for noticing everything that's annoying about modern children's films and including none of those things in his movie.
Full Review
75

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Phillips
Twenty or 30 minutes into Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium the urge to flee may rise within you like an oceanic tide. But stick with it. The film is very sweet--in fact it represents the dawn of a new sport, Extreme Whimsy.
Full Review
75

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
Hoffman has countless characters inside of him, and this is one of his nicest.
Full Review
63

TV Guide

By Ken Fox
This isn't your usual kiddie fare: Beneath the initial glare and blare is a quietly literate script by first-time writer-director Zach Helm that deals directly with big issues like believing in yourself and living on after a loved one passes away. But is it heavy? Not really.
Full Review
63

USA Today

By Claudia Puig
Writer/director Zach Helm, who wrote "Stranger Than Fiction," achieves bursts of charm and whimsy, but not quite enough magic to elicit a consistent sense of wonderment.
Full Review
50

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Carrie Rickey
In this G-rated movie the effects are gee-whiz, with live giraffes amid the stuffed animals and bouncy balls so manic that they could use some Ritalin.
Full Review
50

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
It's hard to escape the feeling that what Zach Helm's directorial debut really wants to be is "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." But where Roald Dahl's story was brilliantly eccentric and respectfully unsentimental, Helm's is heavy with strained zaniness and hazy morality.
Full Review
50

The Hollywood Reporter

By Sheri Linden
For all its playful touches and neat-o nostalgia for nondigital entertainment, the whimsy feels forced.
Full Review
50

Boston Globe

By Wesley Morris
About a magical toy shop, but it has some of the sadder moments I've seen in a movie all year.
Full Review
0

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
Mr. Magorium, who is 243 years old (so are his jokes), is a cross between Willy Wonka and Geppetto, but Hoffman plays him with little more than a goofy dumb lisp, achieved by tucking his lower lip under his upper teeth, so that he looks just as rabbity-stoopid as he sounds.
Full Review
48 out of 100
Mixed or average reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.