88

Slant Magazine

By Joseph Jon Lanthier
Few recent studies of commercialized sex have been character profiles, so Rob Schröder and Gabrielle Provaas's documentary is an unusual and welcome polemic.
Full Review
80

Time Out New York

By Eric Hynes
Truthfully, watching septuagenarian whores spank mildly titillated johns and test-drive sex toys has never seemed so ho-hum - or so oddly familiar.
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80

Variety

By Ronnie Scheib
Rob Schroder and Gabrielle Provaas' raunchy, hilariously uninhibited documentary should wow arthouse audiences.
Full Review
75

The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

By Rick Groen
Despite the occasional stumble, the doc never falls, thanks to the sheer strength of its subjects' undaunted and indomitable character.
Full Review
75

The A.V. Club

By Noel Murray
Ultimately, Meet The Fokkens isn't a documentary about elderly hookers; it's about two women forced into a hard life by circumstance, who tried to make the best of their situation, and are trying still.
Full Review
75

New York Post

It's an uneasy tonal mix that wants to have it both ways - this is a difficult way to pay the rent, but look at how charming the Fokkens are.
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70

Village Voice

Directors Rob Schröder and Gabrielle Provaas capture some un-pretty details of spankings, HJs, and dominance scenarios, but the film is about two old ladies, still cackling despite the sadness that trailed in the wake of the lives into which they were forced.
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70

The Hollywood Reporter

By John DeFore
Warm-hearted and entertaining, if more sad than its quirky premise suggests.
Full Review
60

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
What we really want is to get to know them. Instead, the film too-aptly reflects life in their line of work: brief interludes rather than intimate soul-baring. That's a shame, since there can't be that many 70-year-old identical twin prostitutes with a 50-year history in the business.
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50

The New York Times

By Manohla Dargis
Why the sisters felt that prostitution was their best alternative remains unclear, either because they aren't interested in revealing that part of themselves, or the filmmakers didn't know how to get them to talk. Or maybe Ms. Provaas and Mr. Schroder weren't interested, for political or personal reasons, in making what, despite the laughter, they ended up with: another sad story about whores.
Full Review
68 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.