100

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Phillips
Baumbach’s achievement stings. It also has the sureness of tone and direction of a Chekhov story.
Full Review
91

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
Which brings us back to Kidman, who really IS sensational here.
Full Review
90

The Hollywood Reporter

By Michael Rechtshaffen
Noah Baumbach has followed up his acclaimed 2005 breakthrough "The Squid and the Whale" with another wryly observed, giddily cringe-inducing, bracingly original winner.
Full Review
88

Premiere

By Glenn Kenny
Margot is a fleet, strangely enjoyable film, animated by the acuity of Baumbach's perceptions and -- this helps a lot -- the frequent laugh-out-loud wit of his dialogue.
Full Review
88

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
Dissenters who see this film as a wallow in self-absorption aren't paying attention. Baumbach is acutely attuned to the droll mind games of smart people who only think they're impervious to feeling.
Full Review
75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
This is Baumbach's best yet.
Full Review
75

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
A broader work than Baumbach's last movie, and it's funnier, too, even as you gasp at the misbehavior.
Full Review
75

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Carrie Rickey
Some call Margot a comedy. For me, it is a tragedy impaled by comic moments.
Full Review
50

New York Daily News

By Jack Mathews
For Kidman, it is a one-note performance dictated by the script. Leigh had more dimension to work with and gives the film's most honest performance. Meanwhile, Black, whose job is mostly to deliver comic relief, is completely lost - that is to say, not funny - in the material.
Full Review
50

USA Today

By Claudia Puig
Watching this movie feels a bit like being trapped on a weekend holiday with an unpredictable and seriously unhappy group of people.
Full Review
66 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.