63

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Carrie Rickey
As one unfamiliar with the novel, I found it hard to tease out its meaning from this handsomely mounted, well-acted, aggressively elliptical adaptation.
Full Review
63

New York Daily News

By Jack Mathews
"Love" would be intolerably boring were it not for the frequent injections of humor, thanks largely to Hector Elizondo as Florentino's uncle, and for Bardem's ultimately winning performance.
Full Review
63

Miami Herald

By Connie Ogle
Sometimes less truly is more, and Love in the Time of Cholera is proof.
Full Review
60

The Hollywood Reporter

Shot on location in vibrant Cartagena, the film's strong suit is aesthetic. Cinematographer Alfonso Beato, designer Wolf Kroeger and costume designer Marit Allen evoke aged exotic locales, rugged rural settings and dimly lit period interiors. A closing, aerial image has a breathtaking, spiritual beauty.
Full Review
50

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
Eventually arrives at a lovely place, but it arrives limping. Small but nagging problems drag it down, such as weird acting choices, bizarre casting and strange aging makeup.
Full Review
50

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Phillips
Newell has done some fine work in all sorts of genres, from “Four Weddings and a Funeral” to “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” but in “Cholera” he seems to be chronicling a half-century of events, passions and desires as a tourist, not a native.
Full Review
50

Boston Globe

By Wesley Morris
Little of the fragile wisdom with which García Márquez imbued that idea has survived this timid Hollywood treatment.
Full Review
50

USA Today

By Claudia Puig
Newell's rendering of the iconic novel is dull and creatively off-kilter, lacking the surreal magic and robust passion of Márquez's signature magical realism style and never fully engaging the viewer.
Full Review
50

New York Post

By Kyle Smith
If you've seen "Gone With the Wind," you've seen what Love in the Time of Cholera isn't.
Full Review
25

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
As for the splendid Spaniard Javier Bardem, now knocking socks off in "No Country for Old Men," his lot is worst of all. He's miscast as the romantic Florentino.
Full Review
43 out of 100
Mixed or average reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.