100

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
Let It Rain touches on class issues, feminism, immigration and the particular challenges facing a single, driven career woman in her 40s. But it's graceful in presenting its ideas, and what emerges is not a polemic but a kind of snapshot of modern-day concerns.
Full Review
100

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
Jaoui neatly, gently, firmly slips political commentary into Let It Rain's articulate mayhem.
Full Review
90

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
This beautifully strange and affecting comedy, which Agnès Jaoui directed from a screenplay she wrote with her husband, Mr. Bacri, is about men who are weak and insecure, and one woman, Agathe, played superbly by Ms. Jaoui, coming to terms with the price of being strong.
Full Review
75

NPR

By Ella Taylor
Jaoui's insights into the human struggle to find meaningful ways to live may not be especially profound, but she brings a warm particularity and a tough but tender compassion to her studies of congenital human discontent and the crazy, often self-defeating ways in which we strive to complete ourselves. If that's bourgeois, we might all plead guilty.
Full Review
75

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Phillips
The interview sessions are all disastrous in one way or another; Let It Rain is at its wittiest when Michel flails around, grousing about his own divorce and child custody troubles without ever quite asking his interview subject an actual question
Full Review
75

ReelViews

By James Berardinelli
As simple and straightforward a movie as one is likely to find in theaters today.
Full Review
75

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Carrie Rickey
At times Let It Rain recalls one of those Katharine Hepburn comedies where the New Woman gets cut down to size so as not to intimidate the Old-School Men. Yet the film so likably deflates the pompous and pumps up the humble that it's hard not to like.
Full Review
70

The Hollywood Reporter

This is very much an actors’ film, not least because director-scripter Agnes Jaoui also appears in front of the camera in the well-seasoned role of Agathe Villanova.
Full Review
63

New York Post

By Kyle Smith
Reflective but only mildly engaging dramedy.
Full Review
40

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
It's all a little insular and very conversational, but the setting is cozy and the performances all pleasantly low-key.
Full Review
72 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.