• Released
  • March 8, 2013
  • (NY; 3/15 LA)
  • R , 1 hr 38 min
  • Romantic Comedy
    Comedy
  • 27 Fan Ratings
60

New York Daily News

By Joe Neumaier
Nothing terribly special here, but perfectly played and a spiritual cousin to such early ’90s indies as “Naked in New York” and “Ed’s Next Move.”
Full Review
50

The New York Times

By Neil Genzlinger
Although Language of a Broken Heart, a romantic comedy written by and starring Juddy Talt, eventually drowns in clichés and predictability, it has a few decent moments of humor and some appealing performances that make it marginally better than most vanity projects.
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50

The Hollywood Reporter

By Frank Scheck
The film lacks the originality or wit to differentiate it from the countless other indie romantic comedies littering our screens.
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50

Chicago Sun-Times

By Mary Houlihan
Language of a Broken Heart has the Lifetime Network written all over it. It’s a fitting entry for that venue but as a theatrical feature, it’s simply not up to the task.
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40

Los Angeles Times

By Glenn Whipp
The film, directed by first-timer Rocky Powell, has a different happy ending in mind, one that adheres to rom-com formulas in a manner that should give it a second life on basic cable. Just don't expect to fall hard for it.
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38

New York Post

By Farran Smith Nehme
Part of the limp-rag ambience is due to Talt, who seems to be channeling Sarah Jessica Parker — which, unsurprisingly, does not work. Mostly it’s due to the script, which fails to meet the major romantic-comedy requirement of being clever about keeping lovers apart. All by itself, “The hero is kind of a drip” doesn’t cut it.
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30

Austin Chronicle

By Kimberley Jones
Back to that question of medium: Scrubbed of the few, ill-fitting four-letter words that earned it an R, Language of a Broken Heart might have made a passable Hallmark or Lifetime TV movie, cushioned by the TV-movie context. But as a theatrical prospect, it’s a fail.
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12

Slant Magazine

A feigned attempt at a stereotypically quirky indie film that has virtually nothing in the way of formal sophistication or narrative ambition.
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10

Village Voice

By Ernest Hardy
Full of familiar tropes, exhausted rhythms, self-conscious references to genre forebears...Language of a Broken Heart, directed by Rocky Powell from a screenplay by Juddy Talt, is pure product.
Full Review
33 out of 100
Generally unfavorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.