100

San Francisco Chronicle

By Walter Addiego
The silence captured in this documentary -- a meditative look at life in the Carthusian monastery of the Grande Chartreuse in the French Alps -- may be the most eloquent you'll ever hear.
Full Review
100

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
One of the transporting film experiences of this or any other year.
Full Review
91

Portland Oregonian

By Marc Mohan
You might not be able to picture yourself in such a life, but you'll be glad that it persists.
Full Review
88

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Wilmington
A film of great spiritual intensity and haunting minimalism that enlarges your concepts of movies and of life. Like the monks of the Carthusian order, it distills something intoxicating through a style that's pure and rigorous.
Full Review
88

Miami Herald

By Marta Barber
Groening doesn't judge the monks' actions, nor does he tell us much about their reasons for choosing such a life. Yet the film brings us into their lives not as an observer but almost as a fellow hermit, making you realize how hard -- or easy -- it would be to commit yourself to such a life.
Full Review
88

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
This beautiful, unfolding film is an antidote to the high-velocity, maximum-volume world most of us find ourselves immersed in, offering a glimpse into a rigorously spiritual alternative. Its calmness, its reflection, is full of allure.
Full Review
88

TV Guide

By Ken Fox
Groning's approach gives the viewer a rare chance to really listen to what water sounds like when it drips from a tin bowl, or the watch what patterns raindrops make when they fall on a shallow puddle -- purely sensual, cinematic experiences. In such moments we sense the point of view of a patient, sensitive filmmaker.
Full Review
75

New York Post

By V.A. Musetto
The overwhelming silence is broken mainly by chanting and the ringing of the monastery bells. Call it life in the slow, slow, slow lane.
Full Review
67

Austin Chronicle

By Marc Savlov
At once eerie, picaresque, evocative, and utterly alien to the reality most viewers inhabit, Into Great Silence is a daring and breathtakingly constructed documentary dream. So much so that the more restless among us may find themselves nodding off.
Full Review
67

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
The movie has a hushed sensual resonance, but it turns faith into an endurance test.
Full Review
78 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.