• Released
  • November 15, 2002
  • R , 1 hr 28 min
  • Art House/Foreign
    Drama
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75

Chicago Tribune

Neil Burger's sharply conceived, inventive movie is a highly involving piece of work.
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75

Miami Herald

By Marta Barber
Far removed from being a Hollywood production. There are no big-name actors and no fancy camera work. But that's what makes it interesting.
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75

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
The film's best trick is the way that it treats conspiracy as a kind of political ''Blair Witch,'' a monstrous murk that haunts us precisely because it can never be seen.
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75

ReelViews

By James Berardinelli
This film offers a compelling scenario of what could have happened. And Burger's look back through the recent mists of time is certainly no less likely or fascinating that Oliver Stone's in "JFK."
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70

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
May be something of a stunt, but it's a fascinating stunt that holds your attention from the start to shortly before the finish.
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63

New York Daily News

By Jack Mathews
Barry, with a raspy Southern accent, gives a chilling portrait of a man who is absolutely sure he killed JFK. Whether he's a psychopath or a schizophrenic is not satisfactorily answered, but it's a fascinating question nonetheless.
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63

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
Like ''Blair,'' it never quite finds a way out of its own built-in dead-end.
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50

New York Post

By Lou Lumenick
Few of the increasingly far-fetched events that first-time writer-director Neil Burger follows up with are terribly convincing, which is a pity, considering Barry's terrific performance.
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50

Christian Science Monitor

By David Sterritt
No "JFK," but the story is weirdly compelling when it focuses on the journalist's growing paranoia as he plunges ever more deeply into a world of conspiracies that may or may not really exist.
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50

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
The movie's storytelling is limp, and writer-director Neil Burger's ultimate unwillingness to commit to a point of view -- was this guy really the assassin? -- seems artistically chicken-hearted.
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60 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.