100

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
In Darkness is an extraordinary movie, and somehow good art creates its own uplift.
Full Review
91

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
The fine Polish director Agnieszka Holland (Europa Europa) pays her respects with a daringly murky-looking movie that demands viewers enter the void too and meet Socha and his Jews as real, flawed men and women behaving in flawed ways under suffocating conditions.
Full Review
85

NPR

By Ella Taylor
The elephant in the room of any discussion of Poland and the Jews is that country's less-than-glorious record of betrayal and collaboration with the Nazis. Holland, who is half-Jewish and whose mother was active in the Polish Resistance, doesn't shrink from that legacy.
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80

Wall Street Journal

By John Anderson
What makes this nominee for the best-foreign-film Oscar singular among Holocaust movies is the way it characterizes the banality of life underground.
Full Review
80

The Hollywood Reporter

By Todd McCarthy
This story of suffering and almost inadvertent humanitarianism is harrowing, engrossing, claustrophobic and sometimes literally hard to watch.
Full Review
80

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
It's a transformation as wrenching to watch as it is vital to remember.
Full Review
75

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
In Darkness is an agonizing experience, especially when Jews are publicly humiliated in the streets and a driving rainstorm nearly drowns those cowering in the depths. Holland means to shake you. In Darkness has the power to haunt will haunt your dreams.
Full Review
75

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
The filmmaker, whose career took off with a very different sort of Holocaust film, 1990's Oscar-nominated "Europa Europa," understands that most of these stories arrive at a point of unspeakable, incomprehensible horror.
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75

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
In Darkness is a disaster movie, and the disaster is the Holocaust. In the space between the two halves of that sentence, you have what works about the film and what's a little creepy.
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55

Movieline

By Michelle Orange
Rather than beginning with the assumption that there is no possibility of our coming to know that kind of suffering exactly and using imagination and insight to truly take us inside the Lvov Jews' plight, Holland makes the base conditions of their confinement a narrative as well as aesthetic priority. And frankly it's boring as shit.
Full Review
74 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.