• Released
  • October 17, 2012
  • (NY; 11/16 LA)
  • NR , 1 hr 56 min
  • Art House/Foreign
    Drama
100

New York Daily News

Each episode of director Leos Carax's film perfectly masters the exact tone of a different genre, finding precisely the saddest moment in each of its vignettes.
Full Review
100

Washington Post

By Ann Hornaday
An electrifying, confounding, what-the-hell-just-happened exercise in unbounded imagination, unapologetic theatricality, bravura acting and head-over-heels movie-love.
Full Review
100

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
An exhilarating puzzle, one of the grand cinematic eruptions of the year.
Full Review
90

NPR

Holy Motors - exhilarating, mournful and always stunning to look at - makes no sense at all if you have your heart set on narrative comprehensibility or even plain old thematic cohesion. It could almost be a film made in a time before language, a rendering of modern life - or modern lives - as a kind of cinematic cave painting. With songs. And a white stretch limo. And Kylie Minogue.
Full Review
88

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
Holy Motors, fueled by pure feeling, is a dream of a movie you want to get lost in. It's a thing of beauty.
Full Review
88

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Phillips
Lavant is splendid in the film, and he's essentially the entire film - and yet, Holy Motors is somewhat more than a contraption built for a fearless performer.
Full Review
88

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
Here is a film that is exasperating, frustrating, anarchic and in a constant state of renewal. It's not tame. Some audience members are going to grow very restless. My notion is, few will be bored.
Full Review
80

The Hollywood Reporter

Exhilarating, opaque, heartbreaking and completely bonkers – French auteur Leos Carax's so-called comeback film, Holy Motors, is a deliciously preposterous piece of filmmaking that appraises life and death and everything in between, reflected in a funhouse mirror.
Full Review
75

Boston Globe

By Wesley Morris
The film has sprung from the mind of the Frenchman Leos Carax and ought to be seen to be believed, on the largest screen you can find, and probably sober, too, since it becomes its own narcotic.
Full Review
75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
You will look in vain for some definite logic to Holy Motors. You could see it as a metaphor for the actor's life, or a story about the desire to transcend the self. Anything you decide is fine.
Full Review
84 out of 100
Universal acclaim
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.