Harrison's Flowers Synopsis
A missing photojournalist's wife embarks on a perilous journey to find him and bring him home.
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Critic Ratings

49
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75

Boston Globe

By Loren King
A powerful portrait of modern journalism and the nobility -- and futility -- of chronicling modern war.
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75

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
MacDowell brings an absolutely riveting conviction to her role. She's strong stuff in a movie that is likewise gripping and powerful.
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75

Chicago Tribune

By Loren King
A powerhouse of a film about modern journalism and war, with battle scenes that have the immediacy and impact of the famed opening sequence...
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75

Miami Herald

By
It's that very savagery -- not its love-can-conquer-all theme -- that makes Harrison's Flowers worth picking.
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67

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
A chintzy melodrama gussied up as hair-trigger combat ''reality,'' but there's no denying the vividness with which the French...
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63

New York Daily News

By Jami Bernard
The movie does have one very perplexing major flaw. It throws in some minor-character narration toward the end, as if test audiences had...
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63

USA Today

By Claudia Puig
As far-fetched as it sometimes seems, the film resonates in the wake of the murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl.
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50

San Francisco Chronicle

By Edward Guthmann
Melodramatic take on love and war.
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40

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
Director Elie Chouraqui, who co-wrote the script, catches the chaotic horror of war, but why bother if you're going to subjugate truth to...
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40

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
What's strong and true in Harrison's Flowers -- the hideous chaos of war, the stirring heroism of photographers and journalists -- falls...
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More Info

Rated R | For strong war violence and gruesome images, pervasive language and brief drug use