100

Village Voice

By Diana Clarke
Burshtein's lush visual sensibility, and the subtle performances of the excellent cast, create an aching portrayal of longing and interdependence that transcends the boundaries of the family's small world.
Full Review
100

The New York Times

By A.O. Scott
What the film makes clear, with unfailing sensitivity and wry humor, is that for Shira and her family the ordinary arrangements of living are freighted with moral and spiritual significance.
Full Review
91

The A.V. Club

By A.A. Dowd
Burshtein shoots in extreme shallow focus, framing her actors against a sometimes-blinding blanket of white fuzz. It’s a decision that, coupled with Yitzhak Azulay’s stirring, chant-driven score, lends each conversation a near religious aura.
Full Review
90

Los Angeles Times

By Kenneth Turan
A transfixing, emotionally complex Israeli drama.
Full Review
88

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Carrie Rickey
Burshtein keeps the camera tight on the faces of her actors in a way that succeeds at making visible the invisible heat between the characters. The film's chaste eroticism and the community's deep respect for Shira's emotional and spiritual growth keep the audience in thrall.
Full Review
88

Boston Globe

By Peter Keough
Burshtein has achieved a gripping film without victims or villains, an ambiguous tragedy drawing on universal themes of love and loss, self-sacrifice and self-preservation.
Full Review
88

Chicago Sun-Times

By Nell Minow
A sympathetic, lay­­ered portrayal, rich with detail, that earns its more complex and resonant conclusion.
Full Review
85

NPR

By Ella Taylor
Burshtein refuses to engage with the culture wars that flare fiercely between secular and religious types in Israel; in fact she's trying to avoid types of any kind, which may be why secular audiences and critics have embraced her rapturous depiction of a community living its life, more separate from than at odds with the society beyond.
Full Review
80

Time Out New York

By Joshua Rothkopf
The film isn’t exactly rousing in its conclusion, but it’s always respectful: a serious ethical inquiry into matters of women’s choice, both imposed and seized upon. Check it out.
Full Review
75

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Phillips
An elegant miniature, Rama Burshtein's Fill the Void labors under a narrative inevitability, but it's artful work nonetheless.
Full Review
79 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.