100

Chicago Reader

By Jonathan Rosenbaum
Jarmusch has said that the film's odd, generally slow rhythm -- hypnotic if you're captivated by it, as I am, and probably unendurable if you're not--was influenced by classical Japanese period movies by Kenji Mizoguchi and Akira Kurosawa.
Full Review
100

TV Guide

A slow-paced but hypnotically absorbing movie, it's buoyed by Jarmusch's trademark off-key humor and embellished throughout by an electrifying instrumental score, courtesy of Neil Young.
Full Review
80

Empire

It's a tale that subtly reinterprets the genre and delivers Jarmusch's most accomplished, if not necessarily his most accessible film to date.
Full Review
75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Edward Guthmann
Dead Man plays a lot of cards at the same time, and Jarmusch occasionally loses his rhythm when he allows his actors their improvisational riffs.
Full Review
63

ReelViews

By James Berardinelli
Filmed in black-and-white with an eerie score by Neil Young, and using contemporary dialogue and mannerisms, Jarmusch's picture has a dream-like quality.
Full Review
50

Austin Chronicle

By Marc Savlov
It's not a bad movie by any stretch of the imagination, just one that grabs your attention and then lets it go, time and time again.
Full Review
42

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
The film has barely started, and already we can tell what we're in for -- two hours of metaphysical drift.
Full Review
38

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
Dead Man is a strange, slow, unrewarding movie that provides us with more time to think about its meaning than with meaning.
Full Review
38

USA Today

By Mike Clark
Coy to a fault, the movie collapses under its own weight with 90 minutes to go, despite Robby Muller's impressive black-and-white photography, which puts the film on a higher artistic plane than other equally unbearable movies. [16 May 1996, Pg.06.D]
Full Review
25

San Francisco Examiner

By Barbara Shulgasser
Particularly because unlike so many other boring movies one sees, Jarmusch films require many more words to explain the boringness than less certifiably artistic films would.
Full Review
58 out of 100
Mixed or average reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.