100

Premiere

By Glenn Kenny
It's also that he's really, honest-to-God, got one of those movie faces that doesn't even come along once every generation. It's astonishing.
Full Review
88

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
Control doesn't claim to know the reasons Curtis killed himself. The act of suicide poses the question why, but rarely answers it, leaving the living to wonder, and to grieve. And there's certainly grief to be had in Control, but also joy. Really.
Full Review
88

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
It's Corbijn, shooting with a poet's eye in a harshly stunning black-and-white, who cuts to the soul of Ian's life and music. You don't watch this movie, you live it.
Full Review
88

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
One of the most perceptive of rock music biopics.
Full Review
83

Entertainment Weekly

By Owen Gleiberman
Control goes past the clichés of punk rock-god gloom to offer a snapshot of alienation that's shockingly humane.
Full Review
75

New York Post

By Kyle Smith
A rock bio minus the fun. The sex is guilt-stricken, the drugs are used to treat epilepsy, and the rock 'n' roll is about isolation and despair.
Full Review
75

New York Daily News

By Jack Mathews
Morton's as good an actress as any working today and in Control, she overcomes an age gap to give one of the year's most heartbreaking and honest performances.
Full Review
75

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
The result is both a surprisingly lucid portrayal of clinical depression and dramatically a bit stiff.
Full Review
75

Chicago Tribune

By Michael Phillips
The cast is excellent, particularly Riley and Morton and, as Joy Division’s brash manager, Toby Kebbell. He’s a great character, bitter and hostile and a scoundrel: a born manager of talent destined to tear itself apart.
Full Review
50

San Francisco Chronicle

By Peter Hartlaub
There's little illumination.
Full Review
78 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.