100

Los Angeles Times

By Sheila Benson
The most brilliantly disturbing film ever to have its roots in small-town American life. [19 September 1986, Calendar, p.6-1]
Full Review
100

The New York Times

By Elvis Mitchell
As fascinating as it is freakish. It confirms Mr. Lynch's stature as an innovator, a superb technician, and someone best not encountered in a dak alley. [19 September 1986]
Full Review
100

ReelViews

By James Berardinelli
Blue Velvet is David Lynch in peak form, and represents (to date) his most accomplished motion picture. It is a work of fascinating scope and power that rivals any of the most subversive films to reach the screens during the '80s.
Full Review
100

Village Voice

The last real earthquake to hit cinema was David Lynch's "Blue Velvet" -- I'm sure directors throughout the film world felt the earth move beneath their feet and couldn't sleep the night of their first encounter with it back in 1986. (Review of 20th Anniversary Re-Release)
Full Review
90

L.A. Weekly

By Scott Foundas
What dazzles still about David Lynch's Blue Velvet is its total authority: Not a single false gesture. No shock delivered solely for its own sake.
Full Review
88

Chicago Tribune

By Gene Siskel
One powerful, mesmerizing thriller, a masterful exercise in controlling an audience's attention. [19 September 1986, Friday, p.A]
Full Review
80

Film.com

By John Hartl
An exhilarating piece of popular entertainment.
Full Review
67

Austin Chronicle

By Marjorie Baumgarten
You either think it's dementedly wild at heart or a lost highway to nowhere.
Full Review
50

San Francisco Chronicle

Dark, menacing and sexual, with satanic overtones, like a Black Sabbath song, with many moments of genuine fright and harsh eroticism. [19 September 1986, Daily Notebook, p.76]
Full Review
25

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
So strong, so shocking and yet so audacious that people walk out shaking their heads; they don't know quite what to make of it.
Full Review
75 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.