88

Chicago Tribune

By Robert K. Elder
Infusion of comedy elements keeps the story light, without dragging it into the cartoonish.
Full Review
83

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
Ong-Bak (taken from the name of the sacred statue) is delivered raw, with an on-the-fly compositional approach from director Prachya Pinkaew that includes dim lighting and jumbled editing.
Full Review
80

The Hollywood Reporter

An effective martial arts film destined to leave mouths agape.
Full Review
75

The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

By Liam Lacey
A thinly plotted, amateurishly acted, cartoonishly violent and hugely entertaining array of jaw-dropping stunts and corny slapstick.
Full Review
75

Baltimore Sun

By Chris Kaltenbach
An opportunity to enjoy the pure adrenaline rush that has always been the hallmark of martial-arts cinema.
Full Review
75

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
Did I enjoy Ong-Bak? As brainless but skillful action choreography, yes. And I would have enjoyed it even more if I'd known going in that the stunts were being performed in the old-fashioned, pre-computer way.
Full Review
75

New York Daily News

By Elizabeth Weitzman
Every action scene is a spectacularly choreographed set piece. At one point, Jaa literally fights with feet of fire. Unfortunately, whenever he comes down to earth, so does the movie.
Full Review
60

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
Ting's exploits grow ever more violent and repetitive, but a lot of Ong-Bak is very enjoyable.
Full Review
50

San Francisco Chronicle

Thus a tightly edited, 90-minute action flick becomes a bloated, 105-minute exercise on how not to direct an action film.
Full Review
50

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
A sizable amount of national pride is on display in Ong-Bak.
Full Review
69 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.