63

Boston Globe

By Wesley Morris
Directing Annapolis is Justin Lin, whose previous feature was the irresponsible high-school comedy thriller "Better Luck Tomorrow." This second movie is more his speed.
Full Review
58

Entertainment Weekly

Compellingly reserved and inscrutable at the start, Franco starts to lose us by the second hour, when his character's still not showing up for roll call on time, and isn't charismatic enough to bring us over to his side.
Full Review
50

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Carrie Rickey
The result is two competing films, one about a failure's struggle to succeed in the Brigade Championships, the academy's boxing tournament, and the other about a quitter redeemed by military discipline. In the hands of director Justin Lin, the two story lines don't altogether merge.
Full Review
50

The Hollywood Reporter

By Frank Scheck
Packing in enough cliches for a dozen movies, this drama about a sensitive young man trying to achieve his dreams via the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis will best be enjoyed by the generation unfamiliar with "An Officer and a Gentlemen," "Top Gun" and any preceding boxing movies.
Full Review
50

TV Guide

By Ken Fox
It's really just "Rocky" in gleaming dress whites.
Full Review
50

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
A formulaic, predictable and yet reasonably likable picture.
Full Review
50

ReelViews

By James Berardinelli
This isn't as much a movie as it is a recipe for a cinematic casserole in which the ingredients are clich├ęs and rip-offs.
Full Review
50

USA Today

By Mike Clark
A hopeless if harmless boxing picture whose principals just happen to wear uniforms outside the ring, Annapolis is set in a U.S. Naval Academy where no one ever seems to attend class.
Full Review
38

New York Daily News

By Jack Mathews
A record number of movie cliches are strung together for the otherwise forgettable boot-camp drama Annapolis.
Full Review
38

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
It is the anti-Sundance film, an exhausted wheeze of bankrupt cliches and cardboard characters, the kind of film that has no visible reason for existing, except that everybody got paid.
Full Review
37 out of 100
Generally unfavorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.