88

Charlotte Observer

By Lawrence Toppman
The movie is the usual kind of film biography of a respected figure from the distant past - honorable, oversimplified, handsome.
Full Review
75

TV Guide

By Maitland McDonagh
A workmanlike piece of storytelling elevated by fine performances.
Full Review
75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
Anyone who has ever felt morally right and completely in the minority will have a point of entry into this movie.
Full Review
75

New York Daily News

By Jack Mathews
Compelling and highly informative.
Full Review
75

Miami Herald

By Connie Ogle
Apted delivers a fine, righteous climax and packs his film with some of Britain's best character actors.
Full Review
75

New York Post

By Kyle Smith
This is the British way to mingle ideas and entertainment.
Full Review
75

Philadelphia Inquirer

By Steven Rea
Apted opts not to show the horrendous cruelty inflicted on thousands upon thousands of captive Africans, shackled and chained, making their way to the Americas in ships. Instead, he has Wilberforce and his fellow abolitionists describe the inhumane conditions - in the precise, passionate language of legislators who believe that human decency is more important than money and power.
Full Review
70

Wall Street Journal

By Joe Morgenstern
A case of good works done well.
Full Review
58

Entertainment Weekly

It's earnest, solemn stuff. The movie sings an old tune -- Albert Finney is the blind minister who wrote the title ditty -- and it leaves the blood unstirred.
Full Review
50

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
It's a doughty movie, stuck halfway between Masterpiece Theatre and Classics Illustrated, but, to his credit, gifted journeyman director Michael Apted understands he's playing the long game.
Full Review
65 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.