• Released
  • November 2, 2012
  • (Limited)
  • R , 1 hr 45 min
  • Drama
    Music/Performing Arts
88

New York Post

By Lou Lumenick
Walken was largely typecast in quirky roles as a result of playing the title character's brother in "Annie Hall," so it's something of a delightful irony that 35 years later, Walken finds his most rewarding role leading a terrific ensemble in what amounts to one of the best Woody Allen movies that Allen wasn't involved in making.
Full Review
88

Chicago Sun-Times

By Roger Ebert
A Late Quartet does one of the most interesting things any film can do. It shows how skilled professionals work.
Full Review
75

Rolling Stone

By Peter Travers
Grace notes abound in A Late Quartet, a small, shining gem of a movie that works its way into your heart with insinuating potency of music.
Full Review
75

San Francisco Chronicle

By Mick LaSalle
For those willing to enter this world and pay attention, A Late Quartet provides distinct and uncommon satisfactions.
Full Review
75

Entertainment Weekly

By Lisa Schwarzbaum
The title refers not only to particular music by Beethoven but also to the fictional string quartet of Yaron Zilberman's fussily genteel, overplotted Manhattan tale in which interpersonal stresses build to a crescendo when one of the foursome becomes ill.
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75

The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

By Liam Lacey
The screenplay by Seth Grossman and Israeli-American director Yaron Zilberman is old-fashioned and melodramatic but stirring in its portrait of people struggling with individual egos to produce something nobler than themselves.
Full Review
70

NPR

By Ella Taylor
It's rare these days to see an old-fashioned, elegant chamber-piece movie about life and art - let alone one with Christopher Walken as, of all things, a steadying influence.
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63

New York Observer

By Rex Reed
Playing the cello is such a pleasant change of pace that he (Walken) eventually grows on you, scene by scene, proving for the first time since his role as Leonardo DiCaprio's troubled father 10 years ago in "Catch Me If You Can," that he really can act. He - along with the rest of the elegant cast - keeps A Late Quartet in tune when it threatens to go flat.
Full Review
63

Boston Globe

By Ty Burr
The performances are worth a look, especially since Christopher Walken so rarely gets to play a sane person.
Full Review
60

The Hollywood Reporter

The film mines both the relationship issues and the Upper East Side neighborhoods of Woody Allen's best work, but could use an added dose of the Woodster's jokes to spruce up a self-serious scenario that hits the right notes about half the time.
Full Review
67 out of 100
Generally favorable reviews
Metascore® based on all critic reviews. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.